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Things Fall Apart. Swiss Art from Böcklin to Vallotton

Exhibitions
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Sigmund Freud claimed in 1917 that mankind has been confronted with three narcissistic outrages, making man an option among many. The exhibition «Things Fall Apart» illustrates how Swiss art, in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, attempted to visually understand this shift in man's importance: Human beings seem to dwindle to nothingness in the landscape’s indifferent monumentality, and peaceful nature is pervaded by an aura of enigma, an inscrutable feeling of tension or even threat and despair; such landscapes often feature mirrors, hermaphrodites and wild animals. Images of sleeping, sick or drunk persons visualise how humans are absorbed by their dreams and ruled by their fears, instincts and multilayered desires.
Sigmund Freud claimed in 1917 that mankind has been confronted with three narcissistic outrages, making man an option among many. The exhibition «Things Fall Apart» illustrates how Swiss art, in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, attempted to visually understand this shift in man's importance: Human beings seem to dwindle to nothingness in the landscape’s indifferent monumentality, and peaceful nature is pervaded by an aura of enigma, an inscrutable feeling of tension or even threat and despair; such landscapes often feature mirrors, hermaphrodites and wild animals. Images of sleeping, sick or drunk persons visualise how humans are absorbed by their dreams and ruled by their fears, instincts and multilayered desires.
Ernest Biéler Les Feuilles mortes, 1899, Öl auf Leinwand, 149,7 x 481,5 cm, Kunstmuseum Bern
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46.950975, 7.443572